São Paulo Biennale (Brazil)

English: Biennale São Paulo: Pavilhão Ciccillo...

English: Biennale São Paulo: Pavilhão Ciccillo Matarazzo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

São Paulo, located in Brazil’s financial center is the largest city in South America, is home to the second oldest and largest art Biennale. The Oxford Dictionary of Art defines Biennale as an international art exhibition that is held every two years and adjudicated by an international committee. Various countries send artists to represent them. A museum curator or similar authority is invited to curate a show based on her or his professional reputation and may nominate representative artists from various countries in the process.

Founded in 1951 by the Italian-Brazilian industrialist Ciccillo Matarazzo (1898-1977), the Biennale de São Paulo is credited for being one the most prestigious biennales in the world. The São Paulo Biennale features both Brazilian and international art, and is considered to be one of the most important art exhibits in the country. Its initial aim was to make contemporary art (primarily from Western Europe and the USA) known in Brazil, to push the country’s access to the current art scene in other metropolises, and to establish São Paulo itself as an international art center. At the same time the biennial brings Brazilian art to foreign guests.

With modernization, Brazil made cultural events a priority. The Biennale de São Paulo plays an important role in promoting the arts – visual art, performance, graphic design, music, cinema, architecture and many other forms of artistic expression. According to artist and critic Eduardo, the Bienniale represents a notable tendency that took place during the 1980s in the art world when attempts were made to break away from the traditional model for presenting art. The impact that the Biennale de São Paulo has had on a cultural scale includes embracing Brazil’s traditions (epitomized the movement known as Antropofagia) and a developing a broad perspective on what constitutes contemporary art. Over a fifty-year period the São Paulo Biennale has issued twenty-five editions. Close to 150 countries have participated, and 10,660 artists have presented approximately 57,000 works. The biennale de São Paulo allows artists from various visiting countries to express him or herself through visual language. A successful exhibition is measured by the level of critical discussion it generates in the art world, as well as other, formal and aesthetic considerations.

Urzsula Kumala

Spring 2010

Works Cited

Aquino, Equardo. “Brazil art. A Question of Scale. Renegotiating Territories of Desire.” Border Crossings 28.1(2009): 42-9

Barnitz, Jaquiline.”Twentieth Century Art of Latin America.: University of Texas Press. 2001: 143-145

Leffingwell, Edward, “Design for Living.” Art in America. (2007): 78-83.

Leffingwell, Edward. “The Extraterritorial Zone.” Art in America. (2005): 48-55.

Miller, Earl. “28th Bienal De São Paulo: In Living Contact.” C Magazine. 101(2009): 44-6.

Rattemeyer, Christian. “27th São Paulo Bienal: São Paulo.” Art forum International. 45.6 (2007): 287(2)-289.

References

Aquino, Equardo. “Brazil art. A Question of Scale. Renegotiating Territories of Desire.” Border Crossings 28.1(2009):42-9

Barnitz, Jaquiline.”Twentieth Century Art of Latin America.: University of Texas Press. 2001:143-145

Leffingwell, Edward, “Design for Living.” Art in America. (2007): 78-83.

Leffingwell, Edward. “The Extraterritorial Zone.” Art in America. (2005):48-55.

Miller, Earl. “28th Bienal De São Paulo: In Living Contact.” C Magazine. 101(2009): 44-6

Rattemeyer, Christian. “27th São Paulo Bienal: São Paulo.” Art forum International. 45.6(2007): 287(2)-289.

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This entry was posted in art exhibitions, Biennale, Brazil, Eduardo Aquino, modern art, São Paulo Art Biennial, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

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